Managing the Risk of Disruption in Your Supply Chain

Supply chain risk management is a strategic imperative due to new and complex challenges in today’s global marketplace


When assessing supply chain disruption risk, CFOs need to ask appropriate questions regarding what could happen to the organization’s ability to fulfill customer orders and continue business operations if any key component of the supply chain were taken away through either failure or an unexpected catastrophe.

For example, which suppliers do we depend on for essential raw materials and component parts? What would happen if we were to lose one of them for any reason? How long would we be able to operate based on inventory buffers or supply or product alternatives? Are there other qualified sources of supply that can be readily available? Do we have inventory downstream in the supply chain to sustain operations during recovery?

What if there were:

  • Temporary shortages in raw materials?
  • Serious defects in supplier raw materials and component parts?
  • Significant disruptions in transportation?
  • Significant component or material price volatility, or spikes due to any of the above?

Do our key suppliers assess their risks? How do they manage their suppliers and supply chain? Do they have effective plans for responding in times of disaster and how do we know? Is there a formalized understanding and agreement in place?

When assessing the potential impact of a supply disruption, CFOs should consider the following:

  • Visibility/transparency. How well are we monitoring our supply chain, and how quickly could we identify a potential issue and its impact?
  • Velocity of the disruption. How quickly would we feel the initial impact?
  • Persistence of the disruption. How long would we be affected if the disruption continued?
  • Response readiness. How resilient would we be in reacting to the loss of any significant supply source?

When these additional factors are considered, risk management begins to intersect with crisis management. During business continuity planning, CFOs should consider all plausible scenarios stemming from the impact of losing strategic sources of supply for an indeterminate period of time.

Their objective should be to assess the immediate impact to the supply chain (e.g., specific suppliers, products and markets) in terms of both supply outage and financial impact, determine the expected recovery time following a severe supply disruption, and implement predefined and tested response plans to minimize the impact. This proactive stance is where many companies fall short and ultimately pay for the cost of inaction.

Strategies to expedite the recovery process should include identifying alternate suppliers or contract manufacturers that can assist following a no-notice manufacturing or logistics disruption. Contingency planning may also point to the merits of postponement strategies and inventory buffers to protect against the uncertainties of supply and demand, maintain customer service levels, as well as prepare for the unexpected.

If the company is reliant on a single-source supplier, finding alternative suppliers may require changing product specifications or working with other key suppliers to develop alternatives. Moving to an alternative supplier may carry risks of quality issues and must be managed carefully. It may be even more challenging in heavily regulated industries in which suppliers must be qualified. Supplier relationships honed over a period of years cannot be replaced overnight with an expectation of comparable performance levels.

In Closing

CFOs need to consider a number of key questions in assessing risks in the supply chains of their organizations. Do we take an end-to-end view of our supply chain when evaluating disruption risks, from second- or third-tier suppliers through customer fulfillment, or focus on a smaller scope initially? For critical suppliers, can we consider all relevant scenarios that could lead to supply disruption? Can we assess our resiliency and response strategies in the event of a supply chain disruption? By working with management and the board to address these questions, CFOs can make significant strides in advancing their organizations’ supply chain risk management.

Christopher Monk and Jim DeLoach are managing directors with Protiviti, a global consulting firm. Monk is a member of the Global Leadership Team for Protiviti’s supply chain practice. DeLoach assists companies with integrating risk management with strategy setting, business planning and performance management.

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