A New Era for Business

Volatility has become a systemic condition and traditional supply chain management models must evolve to meet the challenges


To reduce order cycle times to customers, many companies are focusing on customer intimacy, which requires a high degree of collaboration between companies and customers and includes such practices as “open book” contracts, gain-sharing and longer-term business commitments. Another strategy is to achieve a fluid production process that allows products to flow from the factory to the transportation system to the customer without excessive downtime in a warehouse or on a shelf. Customers such as retailers want access to inventory but don’t want to hold it. Meanwhile, manufacturers cannot afford to carry excess inventory. This means that inventory levels across the end-to-end supply chain have become leaner.

To spot demand changes more rapidly, some companies have created centralized supply chain volatility monitoring groups. Their mission is to constantly scan the global market and mine company sales data for change indicators and new demand patterns. The goal of these groups is to identify which demand fluctuations are “ad hoc” or one-off blips, and which reflect a true demand change — and execute accordingly.

To address demand variability, some companies are embracing more adaptive inventory strategies. To support greater flexibility in responding to demand variability, these companies are changing the way they contract with 3PLs. Contracts are relationship-based rather than transaction-based. They are partnership-oriented, longer term (five to seven years) and incorporate mechanisms that enable both parties to adapt to change. The overarching goal of these partnership contracts is to be able to respond to demand variability as it occurs while enabling longer term growth for both parties.

To achieve these results, executives are employing a number of different technologies. They are looking to restructure the IT underpinnings of their supply chains and, in particular, take advantage of new collaborative computing architecture and technologies.

A key collaborative technology focuses on visibility—on a real- or near-real-time level—that is essential in more intimate, yet simultaneously more multi-tiered, business relationships. To gain this visibility quickly and without huge IT infrastructure investment, leading companies are “moving to the cloud.”

Cloud computing among trusted trading partners, whereby participants share in a common platform of resources, software, information and computing hardware, facilitates quick, highly scalable collaboration that is not possible with older, fixed-connection models and technologies. For all companies, regardless of industry, cloud computing enables more and better business collaboration. It also fosters closer bonds—i.e., greater “stickiness”— among supply chain partners.

Companies also are investing in business analytics to enable them to identify trends faster and more accurately. Business intelligence (BI) tools mine data from myriad sources—point of sale, demand management, inventory, order, warehouse and transportation management systems—to generate actionable information on which to base business decisions.

It is clear that agility and responsiveness as unique supply chain disciplines are on the rise. Most companies have cut costs and inventories over the past two years, and will continue to do so. But the real opportunities in supply chain management lie in improving agility and visibility. There is a lot of work yet to be done in this area. Largely manual, ad hoc trading partner collaboration practices continue to be the norm rather than the exception. Ultimately, volatility management cannot improve if these processes are not automated, connected and streamlined.

About the Author: Richard Douglass is the Worldwide Industry Director of Manufacturing and Logistics for the B2B & Commerce Industry Solutions group of IBM. In this role, Douglass directs top-line marketing strategy for the group’s B2B and Commerce solutions while serving as a liaison to customers within the manufacturing and logistics industries.

Takeaways:

  • Volatility is a systemic condition
  • Agility and responsiveness as unique supply chain disciplines are on the rise
  • Consider the cloud
  • Customers such as retailers want access to inventory but don’t want to hold it
  • Enhance Your Experience.

    When you register for SDCExec.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

Already have an account? Click here to Log in.

Enhance Your Experience.

When you register for SDCExec.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required