Time to Roll with RFID

Knowing about RFID is only the first step to competitive success


By Owen Davis

Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been around for more than a decade, slowly gaining momentum. But only recently has it taken a front-row seat as a promising and viable option to track, monitor and manage inventory, assets and shipments.

Unlike its predecessor, bar codes, RFID requires a complete and dedicated investment in people, systems and processes. It's not a quick fix or a place to test the waters; rather, it requires a complete paradigm shift and process re-engineering. But it's an investment that companies are beginning to accept. Market research firm Gartner Inc. predicts the market for RFID products will grow from $504 million in 2006 to more than $3 billion by 2010.

Some companies turned to RFID in response to mandates from major entities like Wal-Mart, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for their supply chain partners to comply with RFID initiatives. A greater number of organizations — more than 40 percent — say they are implementing RFID to improve operations and supply chain processes, according to ChainLink Research.

That level of implementation and timetable of implementation creates two urgencies: a demand for a skilled RFID workforce and training for existing employees now forced to embrace this strange new world of technology. Since most of the early adopters of RFID are either self-taught or skilled in the more technical aspects of RFID, the responsibility lies heavily on No. 2: training (and retraining) the workers who've been doing it the old way.

According to author and futurist Stewart Brand, once a new technology rolls over you, if you're not part of the steamroller, you're part of the road. It's time to roll with RFID.

Challenges and Skills

Since its inception, RFID has presented a number of challenges. Among those are the cost and quality of RFID labels, limited competition between manufacturers trying to market their RFID systems or products, and return on the RFID investment. But one of the greatest challenges has been lack of end-user awareness about RFID technology and its potential applications.

The end-user group — those who work in companies who are using or have the potential to use RFID technology — lacks the understanding that RFID is not a tool unto itself, but rather, an enabling technology with systems to capture and use data for various applications. The possibilities are limitless but are now just being explored to their full capacity. Manufacturers such as Proctor & Gamble and retailers such as Best Buy and Sears are now using RFID for physical asset management, theft prevention and process tracking. Other companies are using RFID to expedite shipments through customs by storing shipping container information electronically for easy retrieval.

RFID end-users at all levels need to understand the basics of RFID technology, the advantages and challenges, the standards and expectations, and the return on investment from RFID technology. Moreover, they should be given a keen understanding and as well as a physical perspective of how the RFID process works: tracking, tracing and authenticating goods as they move through the supply chain. And they should be given specialized training, as needed, regarding mandates, technology updates and how to tag challenging materials.

While this may be obvious for those production or distribution-area associates who are in direct contact with RFID tags or readers at end-user companies or distributors, the training needs to extend to management whose responsibility is business processes, change management, ROI calculation or information technology. By educating this combination of direct workers and those who oversee the big picture, end-user companies will not only learn to use the technology, but immerse themselves in the new RFID-enabled culture, and discover additional applications and solutions to benefit their business.

Innovation and Process Improvement

This content continues onto the next page...
  • Enhance Your Experience.

    When you register for SDCExec.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

Already have an account? Click here to Log in.

Enhance Your Experience.

When you register for SDCExec.com you stay connected to the pulse of the industry by signing up for topic-based e-newsletters and information. Registering also allows you to quickly comment on content and request more infomation.

OR

Complete the registration form.

Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required
Required