How to Catch the Right Superstar to Lead Your Supply Chain Organization

Rock star candidates possess key traits making them instant high achievers, but hiring managers must understand when they are likely to be successful in wooing these superstars


8. Great Mentors. Rock star executives understand how to successfully mentor their direct reports along the path in order to achieve a team success. In reality, direct reports are less threatened by the arrival of a rock star manager if they believe they are likely to glean some expertise.

9. Overachievers. An all-star in any arena always pushes everyone around them to go "beyond the achievable." These types of individuals are never happy with a goal within their reach. Once a goal has been reached, they move the high bar of the next managerial high jump even further up.

10. High Energy. There is almost always a high-energy and charismatic quality to these leaders. Their enthusiasm and confidence can energize the entire team.

When to Pursue the Rock Star Candidate

Of course, every executive wants these rock stars on their team. But senior executives need to apply certain litmus tests to determine when they are likely to be successful in wooing these superstars.

Hiring managers have to offer an intrinsic benefit to rock star candidates in order to get them to jump ship. If the new job is identical in nature to the existing one, these star candidates will rarely change jobs. These high achievers thrive on newness and situations that stretch their managerial capabilities.

While money is clearly an incentive to attract executives, extrinsic factors such as compensation are rarely sufficient to keep talented super stars on board in the long term. If the career move is fundamentally a lateral one, then the new opportunity has to offer other intrinsic aspects, such as a more entrepreneurial environment, a rapid growth company (with enormous upside) or a new industry.

It is vital to differentiate between the candidate who is open minded to a change versus the one who is highly ambivalent at the start. Highly ambivalent candidates who are closed-minded at the start will often jettison the interview process early on, because they do not perceive any intrinsic value to changing jobs.

The hiring manager should assess whether there is something fundamentally beneficial (other than compensation) that he or she can offer the candidate that is an unmet need at their current job. A probing line of questioning can often illuminate the areas of a candidate's current job that are unsatisfying.

Note that it is unwise to make concrete promises of possible future promotions within the new organization before the actual performance of the new employee can be assessed at the initial job. If the timeline of these promises is not fulfilled, a new employee will feel disappointed and may very well look for a greener pasture at another company.

In summary, if the hiring manager cannot offer significant intrinsic benefits to the rock star, they are likely to find the wooing of the star to be a futile pursuit.

Catching a Rising Star

That said, if a hiring manager cannot attract a rock star candidate, another strategy is to target up-and-coming rock stars that have not yet been "discovered." Undiscovered rock stars may have managed a smaller team, or they have been the most senior supply chain manager within their organization without the matching title.

These rising stars do possess all the innate intelligence and problem-solving skills of rock stars, but they may be diamonds in the rough that can achieve true rock star status through a degree of mentoring. Importantly, these undiscovered and unrecognized rising stars are often more amenable to changing jobs if they perceive the opportunity as one that gives them the risks and rewards that they crave.

Note that it is always beneficial to ask candidates to quantify their openness to job change on a scale of one to 10 (10 being the highest). Of course, this can increase or decrease during the recruiting process, but candidates with an initial openness rating of five or below rarely become viable candidates in the long run. Ultimately, this question can help quantify the candidate's true openness to the job.

Everyone wants a rock star, but rising rock stars should not be overlooked. ¦

About the Author: Steven Lutzer is the president of Lutzer Global Inc., an executive search firm that specializes in managerial talent in the field of supply chain, strategic sourcing and materials management. Lutzer had a 20-plus year career in supply chain management and global sourcing before founding Lutzer Global. More information at www.lutzerglobal.com.

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