Frontline Workers Want to be Heard on Issues That Matter

Job loss as a result of reporting a safety or quality issue to management, including adherence to COVID-19 protocols, is a real concern for many frontline workers.

Godji10 Adobe Stock Manufacturing Workers
godji10/Adobe Stock

The majority of American, Australian and British frontline workers (67%) say that they are never, rarely or only sometimes listened to on topics that matter to them the most  – operations (54%), safety (46%) and health/wellbeing (49%), according to new research by SafetyCulture 

 

“While frontline workers have kept our nations running over the past 18 months, many don’t feel that their voices are valued. It’s clear that these critical workers want a say in the operations and running of their workplaces. Two-way communication between frontline workers and management is no longer a ‘nice to have;’ it is a business imperative. Leaders need to be arming their teams with the right tools to allow them to add value, be heard and stay safe, says Bob Butler, global general manager of SafetyCulture. 

From SafetyCulture: 

  • Just over one in four American and Australian frontline workers (27% each) feel empowered to take action and solve an issue themself. In the UK, just over one in five frontline workers feel empowered to tackle issues (22%).
  • Job loss as a result of reporting a safety or quality issue to management, including adherence to COVID-19 protocols, is a real concern for many frontline workers. 
  • Over one in three frontline workers (34%) agree their willingness to provide workplace feedback is impacted by a belief that “nothing will be done” once reported.
  • Seven in 10 frontline workers (70%) describe training as either very important or a top priority ahead of a competitive holiday allowance (40%). 
Latest