Siemens Recognized for Supporting Diversity through STEM

Plano, TexasJune 6, 2014Siemens was named a Top Supporter of Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU) for the 12th consecutive year, according to the annual survey conducted by Career Communications Group, Inc. Siemens supports diversity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education by providing in-kind grants of software to HBCU Engineering schools through its product lifecycle management (PLM) software business.

Siemens is committed to revitalizing manufacturing in the United States through STEM education and diversity initiatives. The company’s academic PLM programs provide education and community development to prepare the next generation of designers, engineers and computer scientists.

The annual Top Supporters of HBCUs list is based on a survey of the deans of 14 of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)-accredited HBCU engineering programs, the corporate-academic alliance and Advancing Minorities' Interest in Engineering (AMIE). The survey asks these individuals and groups to rank organizations on the level of support they provide through infrastructure modernization and enhancement, research and mentorship projects, participation on advisory councils, faculty development opportunities, scholarships, student projects, stipends, co-ops and career opportunities.

"We are dedicated to helping develop the next generation of highly trained and highly qualified engineers and technologists through diversity initiatives and STEM educational programs," said Chuck Grindstaff, president and CEO, Siemens PLM Software. "Siemens remains committed to its partnerships with the HBCU academic community and other academic institutions, which support programs that encourage students to pursue careers that will revitalize manufacturing in the U.S. and around the world."

Siemens PLM Software provided in-kind software grants with a list price of more than $1.2 billion to HBCU and Historically Spanish Colleges and Universities (HSCU?) engineering schools, empowering their students—with the same PLM tools used by many manufacturers and technology companies—to aggressively compete for jobs that will help employers improve time to market, product cost, quality and innovation.

Loading