The EQ Factor

Navigating through the emotions around Lean changes


Organizations increasingly are providing training and development that is explicitly labeled as "emotional intelligence" or "emotional competence" training. This would include most management and executive development efforts as well as training in supervisory skills, diversity, teamwork, leadership, conflict management, stress management, sales, customer relations, etc. Skills in this area specifically include how to be a change catalyst and how to manage conflict. Momentum toward successful EQ changes can be sustained with the following efforts:

  • Training everyone at every level.
  • Coaching on EQ and accountability
  • Asking higher-order questions
  • Rewarding those who demonstrate a EQ skills and accountability
  • Holding people accountable for progress

Cary Cherniss, Ph.D. of the Consortium For Research On Emotional Intelligence In Organizations has developed an approach for improving EQ performance involving the steps of Preparation, Training, Knowledge Transfer, and Evaluation (See Figure 3). Many organizations use 360-degree assessments that include boss, peer and subordinate ratings. However, the principles for developing this type of competence differ greatly from those that have guided much training and development practice in the past. Developing emotional competence requires that we unlearn old habits of thought, feeling and action that are deeply ingrained and grow new ones. Such a process takes motivation, effort, time, support and sustained practice. The approach also suggests that the preparation and transfer-and-maintenance phases of the training process are especially important. Yet often these phases are neglected in practice.

Figure 2— The Optimal Process for Developing Emotional Intelligence in Organizations (by Cary Cherniss, PhD. From Consortium For Research On Emotional Intelligence In Organizations).

  • Preparation

  • Training

  • Transfer

  • Evaluation

Conclusion

In today's business culture of real-time forecast changes, SKU rationalizations done quarterly, shrinking inventory levels, asset reductions, flexible factories, shorter cycle times, global supply (of RMs or FGs), and efficiency or die attitudes, business leaders must build up a thick skin and enhance their EQ skills to survive and thrive. EQ benefits include a stronger persistence, increased optimism, improved problem solving, heightened creativity, curiosity and cooperation, intensified trustworthiness and dependability.

Resources

Goleman, Daniel. Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ, Bantam Books, 1995.
Salovey Ph. D., Peter (Editor), Mayer, Ph. D. John, Emotional Intelligence: Key Readings on the Mayer and Salovey Model, Jossey-Bass, Inc. 1998.
Mayer, J.D., Caruso, D., and Salovey, P. Emotional intelligence meets traditional standards for intelligence. Intelligence, 27(4), 267-298.
Emotionally Intelligent Parenting: How to raise a Self-disciplined, Responsible, Socially Skilled Child. Elias, Maurice. Three Rivers Press, 1999.
Caruso, David, Salovey Ph. D., Peter. The Emotionally Intelligent Manager: How to Develop and Use the Four Key Emotional Skills of Leadership, Jossey-Bass, Inc. 2004. mindspring.com
Bar-On, Reuven. The Handbook of Emotional Intelligence: Theory, Development, Assessment, and Application at Home, School and in the Workplace, Jossey-Bass, Inc. 2000.
Cherniss, Cary and Goleman, Ph. D., Daniel. The Emotionally Intelligent Workplace: How to Select For, Measure, and Improve Emotional Intelligence in Individuals, Groups, and Organizations, Jossey-Bass, Inc. 2001.
Conners, Roger, Smith, Tom and Hickman, Tom. The Oz Principle — Getting Results through Individual and Organizational Accountability, Penguin Group, Inc. 2004.
Segal, Jeanne. Raising Your Emotional Intelligence: A Practical Guide, Henry Holt and Company, 1997.
Brock, Lillie and Salerno, Mary Ann. The Interchange Cycle, The Secret to Getting Through Life's Difficult Changes, Bridge Builder Media. 1994.
Lynn, Adele. The Emotional Intelligence Activity Book: 50 Activities for Promoting EQ at Work, HRD Press. 2002.
Senge, Peter. The Fifth Discipline Field book, Doubleday Books, 1994. Cooper, Robert and Sawaf, Ayman. E.Q. Executive, The Berkley Publishing Group. 1997.
Kouzes, James M. and Posner, Barry Z. The Leadership Challenge, 3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, 2002.
Piskurich, George. The ASTD Handbook of Training Design and Delivery, McGraw-Hill, 2000.
Gebelein, Susan. Successful Manager's Handbook: Develop Yourself, Coach Others, Personnel Decisions International Corp., 2004

About the Author: Scott T. Barrella, MS, CPIM has been a supply chain leader at Nestle USA for the past six years. Prior to working at Nestle, he held key supply chain management roles at Disney, Amgen and 3M. Barrella has 17 years of Supply Chain Management experience and became APICS certified (CPIM) in 1992. He is also a former APICS Chapter Board Member (San Fernando Valley Chapter) and CPIM Class Instructor. Barrella holds both a BS and an MS from California State University Northridge and is an adjunct faculty member at CSUN. He has an extensive background in Organizational Development and Lean Management.

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