Understanding the Four Pillars of Supply Chain Technology

What you need to know about the information technology that drives your supply chain — and ensures that your supply chain drives profitability


4. Alignment with organization and process. To aid in decision making, technology tools (and the way they are implemented) need to align with the organization that is making the decisions and with that organization's business processes. Often, this comes down to the user-tool interface and the "care and feeding" required by the tool. For example, if the tool requires a high level of inventory accuracy to yield good decisions, the organization and processes must be capable of delivering that inventory accuracy both in the warehouse and in the timely feeds of data into the tool. (It doesn't help to have the accuracy on paper, but not in the tool that needs the data.)

Finally, alignment means that key decision-makers up and down the supply chain organization must have adequate access to all the information they need to make their decisions. Sometimes this is no easy task, with "separation-of-duties" requirements that have been forced into the supply chain by Sarbanes-Oxley legislation or similar regulatory requirements. It is important to make sure that "separation-of-duties" doesn't end up becoming "separation-of-process."

Once these pillars are in place, the technology may be exploited further as a competitive advantage to drive businesses profitability.

Supply Chain Technology for Competitive Advantage

While all businesses need to identify the critical supply chain decisions that drive profitability and choose the proper technology to support those decisions, smart businesses also leverage supply chain technology for competitive advantage. They have a deeper appreciation of the uncertainty their businesses face every day and can make decisions that lead to profitability under a wide range of possible futures. Typically these businesses are using advanced decision-making tools that have one or more of the following features:

  • Scenario analysis
  • Business optimization
  • Risk assessment

Effective scenario analysis allows decision-makers to test the impact of their decisions under many possible futures. We all know the sales forecast is wrong, but not by how much and in which direction. Prices for energy, transportation and raw materials have been fluctuating wildly. The rise of a larger middle class in India, China and other "low-cost countries," along with the rise in fuel prices, brings new scrutiny to what once looked like smart global sourcing decisions. Scenario analysis tools allow decision-makers to analyze performance across a wide range of scenarios and choose a solution that may not be the absolute "best" decision in any given scenario, but results in the "best" overall performance across all of the scenarios. Understanding how decisions today will affect the business tomorrow is invaluable for those who want to plan for profitability beyond the next quarter.

Optimization technology is entering its heyday. The quantity, quality and depth of company data are astounding. Optimization technology now enables the thought leaders in supply chain processes to make decisions that squeeze out additional percentage points of profitability and that are robust enough to do well under varying conditions in the marketplace. For example, a major automobile parts supplier that imports the majority of its stock from overseas has embedded an optimization routine into the container offloading process, resulting in a 16 percent increase in daily offload and a corresponding decrease in cost. This success was only possible because the supplier had accurate knowledge of the contents of the containers being offloaded and the need for those parts in its distribution centers around the country.

Risk assessment and analysis is the newest frontier in supply chain decision making. Decisions that look excellent given a traditional set of assumptions about what customers, competitors and suppliers are doing don't always turn out to be correct, and the pain from a wrong choice can be extraordinary. Risk assessment tools, often based on simulation technologies and statistical analysis, can help companies understand and manage the risks. Consider the plight of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner program. First, Boeing failed to consider the risk that its suppliers would have difficulty supplying subassemblies instead of the individual parts they had supplied in the past. Then, once the subassemblies started to arrive, the whole operation ground to a halt because there were not enough fasteners to assemble the plane in the Everett, Wash., factory. Clearly, Boeing's approach to managing the risk of mundane parts supply outages helped to kick it when it was already down.

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