The Time to Rethink Energy Procurement Is Now

Energy procurement requires a comprehensive strategy to maximize savings and minimize risk, and now is the time to get started


The energy-saving steps could be as simple as educating a facility's operating personnel on the correct procedure for the energy efficient operation of equipment, or as complex as retrofitting or re-commissioning a building, implementing solar pipes or daylighting, or installing "smart meters" to measure — and improve — energy usage. Oswald says that about two years or less is the norm in terms of payback on these types of projects, but he notes that the ROI can come more immediately in many cases. He cites manufacturing facilities that have gone through motor efficiency upgrades and saved up to $450,000 a year; a large multi-tenant warehouse facility that is saving $220,000 a year after putting in energy metering and performing energy analysis and retro-commissioning; and a $6,000 investment in retro-commissioning a major piece of equipment that yielded almost $20,000 in energy savings in the first three months.

The Procurement Side

On the procurement side of the equation, Greybeard recommends that companies take a cross-functional approach to energy, involving not only purchasing but also operations, regulatory, engineering and sustainability as part of a comprehensive energy management team. Procurement does not have a long history of involvement in energy management, since, prior to natural gas deregulation in the 1980s, companies really had no option but to pay the regulated price for supplies from the local utility. Today, with the ability to select among providers in many markets, procurement's role in energy management has become more important, given the function's expertise in contracts and markets, as well as its risk management perspective.

Greybeard also urges companies to adopt a comprehensive energy management approach that addresses not only energy procurement — from vendor selection and contract negotiation to price and supply risk management — but also consumption management, sustainability and alignment with corporate social responsibility goals, and regulatory or legislative affairs.

Ted Eichenlaub, a senior advisor at Greybeard with lengthy experience around energy in the steel industry, says that, at a minimum, procurement professionals working with energy must have a degree of technical expertise to be effective on an energy management team. "You need to be able to talk with your counterparts within the company, so you need to understand the acronyms and have a basic understanding of what the consumption of energy is all about." At companies for which energy comprises a significant amount of the total spend — say, for an energy-intensive process manufacturer — procurement must be able to bring deeper insights to the table, including expert knowledge of markets and the relevant vendors, and the ability to apply hedging strategies. For less energy-intensive companies, Eichenlaub adds, it might be more cost effective to tap outside expertise on a project basis rather than investing in developing internal subject matter experts.

Franolic says that the opportunities for savings on the procurement side of energy management can be significant, and he cites an example of one company Greybeard worked with that was able to generate more than $1 million in annual benefits by taking advantage of the way that certain regulations were written, and another company that saw substantial savings from improving the electric supply agreements for its dozen facilities. The savings can be a magnitude smaller, too, Eichenlaub notes, for companies that consume less energy, but can still add up to a large percentage of an organization's total energy spend.

With the U.S. Government projecting worldwide energy consumption to increase by nearly 50 percent between 2007 and 2035, including by 14 percent in developed nations, the business case for engaging in comprehensive energy management is becoming ever stronger. And pressures to "go green" will only add more ammunition to the business case. As Franolic says, the time for companies to start thinking about energy management is now, and enterprises that fail to engage with an energy strategy now may find themselves at a competitive disadvantage in the wake of the next spike in oil prices or the next disruption in supply.

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